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Mark Foote

Member Since 23 Sep 2009
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 08:00 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Purify your Intention

Yesterday, 07:56 PM

"... making self-surrender (one's) object of thought, (one) lays hold of concentration, lays hold of one-pointedness of mind."

 

(SN V 2 , Pali Text Society volume 5 pg 175-176)

 

 

So here is an intent described by Gautama (long before anyone called him the Buddha) connected with concentration.  To my mind, the phrase "self-surrender" concerns the doer of action, hence:  "by making the surrender of voition in action the object of thought, one lays hold of concentration, one lays hold of one-pointedness of mind."  

 

Evidence that action can take place in the absence of volition is clear in the action of persons under hypnosis.  That such action without volition takes place in a state between waking and sleeping in normal everyday life has been the nature of my experience.

 

Concerning the eight-fold path, Gautama said this:

 

 

"(Anyone)…knowing and seeing eye as it really is, knowing and seeing material shapes… visual consciousness… impact on the eye as it really is, and knowing, seeing as it really is the experience, whether pleasant, painful, or neither painful nor pleasant, that arises conditioned by impact on the eye, is not attached to the eye nor to material shapes nor to visual consciousness nor to impact on the eye; and that experience, whether pleasant, painful, or neither painful nor pleasant, that arises conditioned by impact on the eye—neither to that is (such a one) attached. …(Such a one’s) physical anxieties decrease, and mental anxieties decrease, and bodily torments… and mental torments… and bodily fevers decrease, and mental fevers decrease. (Such a one) experiences happiness of body and happiness of mind. (repeated for ear, nose, tongue, body, and mind).

 

Whatever is the view of what really is, that for (such a one) is right view; whatever is aspiration for what really is, that for (such a one) is right aspiration; whatever is endeavour for what really is, that is for (such a one) right endeavour; whatever is mindfulness of what really is, that is for (such a one) right mindfulness; whatever is concentration on what really is, that is for (such a one) right concentration. And (such a one’s) past acts of body, acts of speech, and mode of livelihood have been well purified.

 

(Majjhima-Nikaya, Pali Text Society volume 3 pg 337-338, ©Pali Text Society)

 

In my own writing, I put it this way:

 

'The abandonment of activity in the body that is occasioned by “making self-surrender the object of thought” will at some point touch on the habitual activity connected with the movement of breath, and at the moment the breath is “cut off” in the surrender of activity, relaxation brings a return to the senses without the application of thought applied and sustained.'

 

I would say that heart-felt belief and intuition suggest the action when habitual activity connected with the movement of breath ceases, but it's really just the movement of breath in a return to the senses.


In Topic: Haiku Chain

22 April 2014 - 08:54 PM

Bare feet on stone chips

A free reflex-zone massage

With every new step.

 

with every new step

the old ways- not that I try

they are not trying


In Topic: What are you listening to?

22 April 2014 - 08:32 PM


In Topic: Haiku Chain

18 April 2014 - 03:43 PM

landing, cat licks arse

then glides the rail and descends

I would if I could

 

I would if I could

have trees that flower year round

in my heart, they will


In Topic: Energy 'blockages' causing health problems

10 April 2014 - 09:16 PM

I practice a little tai-chi, and some sitting in the lotus morning and evening.  I do a few stretches now to make sure I don't strain anything getting into the lotus, things like a ham-string stretch of both legs and the plow posture.

 

Took me quite a while to be able to sit the lotus without pain or numbness for 30-40 minutes.  I always figured I had to be gentle and learn what I needed to know out of relaxation, find a way to let my breath speak to my needs, as it were.

 

I would think that something like tai-chi that moves might help, but just sitting on a chair is a good way to sort it out if you stay forward on the chair, the chair has four legs solidly on the floor, and you put the ball of one foot directly under the same-side sit-bone.  I would not adopt any "body-posture challenge", as Wikipedia described it (in the section on proprioception), that produces the symptoms you mentioned.  

 

Good luck with it, maybe go out dancing more?