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Master Kwan Sai-Hung


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#1 maximolevel

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Posted 27 December 2008 - 09:08 AM

Hello

Do any one have meet or still train whit Master Kwan Sai Hung?

I had just found this info:

http://en.wikipedia....i/Kwan_Sai_Hung

http://www.martialta...ead.php?t=59217

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Bye

Edited by maximolevel, 27 December 2008 - 09:15 AM.


#2 Hugo_M

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 06:29 AM

Master Kwan Sai-Hung had a seminar this year:

http://kwansaihung.com/

:)

I going to save money this year so i can go and train on the next seminar if possible :)

Regards

#3 林愛偉

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 09:02 AM

Hello

Do any one have meet or still train whit Master Kwan Sai Hung?

I had just found this info:

http://en.wikipedia....i/Kwan_Sai_Hung

http://www.martialta...ead.php?t=59217

Posted Image

Bye



He just did a seminar in Manhattan, New York, about 3 weeks ago. I was invited, but couldn't make it.

There are a few seminars he does a year...but only about 5 hours each.

Peace,
Lin

Lin Ai Wei


归真哲文网上学会

Gui Zhen Philo-Cultural Online Society


#4 Hugo_M

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Posted 16 April 2009 - 06:31 AM

He just did a seminar in Manhattan, New York, about 3 weeks ago. I was invited, but couldn't make it.

There are a few seminars he does a year...but only about 5 hours each.

Peace,
Lin


good to know Lin i hope i can be someday in one of these seminars

How is to be learning Qi gong whit Master Kwan Sai-Hung?

Also if interested to read: http://www.emptyflow...amp;#entry98218

#5 WhiteTiger

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Posted 21 May 2009 - 11:27 PM

He just did a seminar in Manhattan, New York, about 3 weeks ago. I was invited, but couldn't make it.

There are a few seminars he does a year...but only about 5 hours each.

Peace,
Lin


I'm curious to know how do you know Master Kwan Sai-Hung?

#6 林愛偉

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 02:18 AM

I'm curious to know how do you know Master Kwan Sai-Hung?



I have friends who know him. I never met him.

Peace,
Lin

Lin Ai Wei


归真哲文网上学会

Gui Zhen Philo-Cultural Online Society


#7 Squatting Monkey

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Posted 22 May 2009 - 10:34 AM

This surely can't be the same Kwan Sai Hung as in Chronicles of Dao.
He would be like 100 years old by now.

#8 WhiteTiger

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Posted 24 May 2009 - 11:44 PM

Yep same one

Yeah he is getting up there.

I love to learn from older people, they are very experienced and if considered masters they must have lots of wisdom.

#9 YMWong

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 12:19 AM

Do any one have meet or still train whit Master Kwan Sai Hung?


Kwan Sai Hung does not exist, it is only a fictional character from a novel written by Deng Mingdao, a book which has close to nothing of actual historical value. The person who goes by that name is an american of (mixed) chinese descent named Frank Kai, born and raised in the US.

"It may be added in this connection that the book [Hedda Morrison's Hua Shan: The Taoist Sacred Mountain in West China], with its fascinating pictures of monks and landscapes, has evidently served as one of the sources for an interesting forgery concerning Huashan, namely Deng Ming-Dao's The Wandering Taoist (San Francisco, 1983). The latter publication contains the biography of one Kwan Saihung, a teacher of martial arts somewhere in the United States, who was ostensibly brought up on Huashan and there initiated into the Zhengyi Huashan sect (sic). The biography is presented as based on stories allegedly told by the master himself. Thus on p. 59 we read, as part of the hero's account of his experiences during his first ascent of Huashan: "The East Peak Monastery was plain stucco and tile and was composed of groups of four-square buildings set in quadrangles. There were also smaller huts of wood and clay. As they passed a hut set behind an iron bell topped with a stone cup that collected dew, Saihung saw a willow-thin man sunning himself on the terrace. He wore grey robes and a black hat with a jade rectangle sewn to its front. The accolytes told Saihung that he was a sorcerer." But comparison with Plate 38 in Morrison's book makes it clear beyond peradventure that the description is based upon this photograph, and not possibly on independent observation at Huashan. No doubt the picture shows the dew-collecting stone cup above the iron bell, but closer scrutiny reveals that in fact the cup is standing at some distance behind the bell. It is thus only the photographic angle that makes it possible to see "an iron bell topped with a stone cup" (in itself, of course, a rather unlikely concept). "

Poul Andersen, A Visit to Huashan in Cahiers d'Extreme Asie 5 (1989-90)

Needless to say, Frank Kai was NOT born in china in 1920 ... unless you expect this guy to be 90 years old :)

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YM
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#10 WhiteTiger

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:02 AM

I'm a little perplexed. although I don't actually believe the story.
That doesn't mean what the story has in it doesn't describe many things to think about many different stages of practices.

Anyway, despite how relevant it is to history or not its clearly stated in the book its a fictional book.

Although I checked and read page 59... in fact I practically reread the whole chapter, I didn't read anything of the above quote.

#11 Squatting Monkey

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:03 AM

Kwan Sai Hung does not exist, it is only a fictional character from a novel written by Deng Mingdao, a book which has close to nothing of actual historical value. The person who goes by that name is an american of (mixed) chinese descent named Frank Kai, born and raised in the US.

"It may be added in this connection that the book [Hedda Morrison's Hua Shan: The Taoist Sacred Mountain in West China], with its fascinating pictures of monks and landscapes, has evidently served as one of the sources for an interesting forgery concerning Huashan, namely Deng Ming-Dao's The Wandering Taoist (San Francisco, 1983). The latter publication contains the biography of one Kwan Saihung, a teacher of martial arts somewhere in the United States, who was ostensibly brought up on Huashan and there initiated into the Zhengyi Huashan sect (sic). The biography is presented as based on stories allegedly told by the master himself. Thus on p. 59 we read, as part of the hero's account of his experiences during his first ascent of Huashan: "The East Peak Monastery was plain stucco and tile and was composed of groups of four-square buildings set in quadrangles. There were also smaller huts of wood and clay. As they passed a hut set behind an iron bell topped with a stone cup that collected dew, Saihung saw a willow-thin man sunning himself on the terrace. He wore grey robes and a black hat with a jade rectangle sewn to its front. The accolytes told Saihung that he was a sorcerer." But comparison with Plate 38 in Morrison's book makes it clear beyond peradventure that the description is based upon this photograph, and not possibly on independent observation at Huashan. No doubt the picture shows the dew-collecting stone cup above the iron bell, but closer scrutiny reveals that in fact the cup is standing at some distance behind the bell. It is thus only the photographic angle that makes it possible to see "an iron bell topped with a stone cup" (in itself, of course, a rather unlikely concept). "

Poul Andersen, A Visit to Huashan in Cahiers d'Extreme Asie 5 (1989-90)

Needless to say, Frank Kai was NOT born in china in 1920 ... unless you expect this guy to be 90 years old :)

Posted Image

YM


I had a feeling that the story was just a work of fiction.
Glad to see that has been cleared up. The world is full of these conmen.

#12 YMWong

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:08 AM

Although I checked and read page 59... in fact I practically reread the whole chapter, I didn't read anything of the above quote.


WT,

Deng mingdao's books has been published and republished, so I guess you are reading a different edition to the one criticized by Anderson (possibly a later edition ?).

YM
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#13 sheng zhen

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:14 AM

I had a feeling that the story was just a work of fiction.
Glad to see that has been cleared up. The world is full of these conmen.

Yes, me too. I did not quite trust this book and I never understood why it gets such a good reputation.

Which books can we trust when it comes to facinating stories about taoist masters(that are still alive today)? ...other than Opening the Dragons Gate.
YMWong, do you know of any?

Edited by sheng zhen, 25 May 2009 - 01:15 AM.


#14 WhiteTiger

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:20 AM

WT,

Deng mingdao's books has been published and republished, so I guess you are reading a different edition to the one criticized by Anderson (possibly a later edition ?).

YM


Most likely a latter edition... Although You gunna practically get me to read 3 or 4 chapters of it again to find out where it says that.

#15 YMWong

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Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:27 AM

Which books can we trust when it comes to facinating stories about taoist masters(that are still alive today)? ...other than Opening the Dragons Gate.
YMWong, do you know of any?


None, in my opinion

For those inclined in this genre I'd suggest an old 'classic' instead:

Posted Image

Seven Taoist Masters
A Folk Novel of China
Translated by Eva Wong
Paperback / Shambhala Classics / 208 pages / 6 x 9
ISBN 978-1-59030-176-0 / October 2004

http://www.shambhala...9030-176-5.cfm/

that depics the story of the early Quanzhen group, including of course the Longmen (to be) founder Master Qiu.

These books, however, should be taken as 'inspirational' and not as (strictly) historical works

YM

Most likely a latter edition... Although You gunna practically get me to read 3 or 4 chapters of it again to find out where it says that.


Well, simply check and let us know the date of publication of your copy to see wether it is later than 1989-90 (date of publication of Anderson's review) and considering that the original version is dated 1983 if the quoted part is not there anymore we can all make up our mind as to why :)

YM
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Posted 25 May 2009 - 03:31 AM

If an explanation is good or not, depends if it is timely or not.
Saihung's book has been a great inspiration for many.
Not in as much as searching for the Real Dao, yet many practicioners that have now real results with practice have started with the poorest resources in terms of information, just like this book we're talking about now.

A timely revelation of the nature of that book would be when the practicioner is mature enough to take things to a next level. An untimely revelation would only for an unprepared practicioner would mean building high doubts about anyone and anything regarding practice. Especially if he liked Saihung's tale.

Cultivation is firstly a matter of the soul to me. You don't run with your boots on into somebody else's soul... unless they invite you to.
No matter how much light you want to make on the subject, people will continue to believe what they believe.
And the ones that don't know left from right are going to be hurt.
It's a big responsability, to start debunking this author or that.

L1

宁 / Ning

Rambunctious much?

Warm reminder: "中国绝学不传外国人, 大家谨记, 传出去的都是些皮毛"





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