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#17 ssttinstitute

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Posted 25 June 2009 - 11:39 AM

Excellent post! Sean.

Martial Arts of Today has strayed much from the moral-ethical integrity of being polite and using martial arts practice to build integrity. (below is an example of those who historically practiced martial arts with dignity and respect with powerful techniques)
http://www.sstt-inst...te/history.html

I will not respond to any post, if there are any insulting, threatening and/or vulgar remarks. Likewise I will NOT post any insulting, threatening, vulgar remarks toward any members of this forum.

Anyone who visit our classes: You will always be treated with kindness and respect. No SSTT students or instructors of SSTT will ever insult, threaten or disrespect your martial arts or you as an individual in class, on this forum or on the streets. SSTT has expelled students and instructors who have an "anger management" problems as we have done so before! This is what we have done in the past, this is the way it is done in the present and how we will continue to conduct ourselves in the future.

In the future we will have SSTT Certified Instructors vs. SSTT Instructors who will undergo much more rigorous training not to be reactive towards negativity in their daily lives! However, SSTT will do severe in-house cleaning and expel any present and/or future student(s) or instructor(s) who violates this Honor Code! You may contact me directly if you see any vulgar post on this forum of any SSTT member(s). If any SSTT member challenges anyone for sport, money or to increase his/her self esteem, they will be expelled! This is why SSTT members will not respond to negative posting(s). If they do you may bring this to my attention on our contact form below and including the URL of their post.
http://www.sstt-institute.org/

The true Masters of martial arts structured their practice in all aspects of their lives by treating others kindly and with respect. Violence was never used because it was "pleasureable" to humilate, satisfy anger and/or increase self-esteem through a false sense of "pride".

We would all do best to follow the example of these exemplary masters who brought true martial arts into our lives. Again, thank you Sean for your post.
http://www.sstt-institute.org/

Edited by ssttinstitute, 25 June 2009 - 11:47 AM.


#18 Stigweard

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 05:24 PM

Posting this in here for greater accessibility.

This article (originally called "Guidelines for Christian-Muslim Dialog") was written for the Interfaith Cultural Organization of Athens for Christian-Muslim dialog, but I feel it is equally pertinent for The TaoBums seeing that, increasingly, we have Buddhists and Taoists engaging in focused and sincere dialog. I have adapted the article slightly for our purpose.

-------------------------------

Principles of Interfaith dialogue

1. Dialogue invites us to come together as people, not as belief systems. It acknowledges that each religious tradition is pluralistic within itself (i.e. Taoism has various monastic sects (Quanzhen, Longmen, Wudang, etc.) as well as philosophical and folk religious aspects just as Buddhism has Theravada, Mahayana, Zen, and Tibetan aspects), and realizes that each dialogue partner speaks from a particular religious perspective that cannot - and does not - represent all adherents of that faith. Dialogue also recognizes that each participant is located within a particular cultural, political, and economic perspective and inevitably brings particular loyalties, commitments, and preconceptions to the relationship. Through dialogue, we get to know one another as individuals.

2. Dialogue, which is characterized by courtesy and respect, is most productive when its participants are considerate, open-minded, and genuine in their desire to learn from the other partners. Each tradition's scripture, beliefs, and practices deserve our respect for having brought countless diverse people into a relationship with God/Buddahood/Tao/Divine Essence etc.

3. Dialogue is enhanced if participants have engaged in a preliminary investigation of the other faith tradition, as well as in an informed and self-critical reflection upon their own faith identity. We must come prepared to the best of our ability, for dialogue enjoins us to listen with and speak from the heart as much as the head, to be open, vulnerable, honest, and sensitive to feelings of frustration or offense.

4. Dialogue enables us to confront inherited preconceptions. It asks us to remember that Taoists and Buddhists share a history of both fruitful exchange and peace as well as of misunderstanding. In dialogue, we are mindful that ambiguous situations sometimes can be misinterpreted or misrepresented. Dialogue deliberately seeks to identify and dispel common stereotypes and inherited misconceptions based on misinformation.

5. Dialogue recognizes that in order to reach a clear understanding, we must pay attention to vocabulary. Some words have specialized meaning within a religious system; the meaning of others varies over time or within certain contexts or between cultures. Dialogue entails a careful clarification of our use of language.

6. Dialogue asks us first to understand, and only then to be understood. In dialogue, we listen in order to understand the other's point of view and seek to understand each person as they understand themselves. We seek to understand each religious system "from within" or on its own terms, while temporarily setting aside our own critical presuppositions.

7. Dialogue is enhanced by each participant's strong faith convictions. In a context of courteous listening and mutual trust, we can offer an authentic expression of our own personal faith. Dialogue involves a humble and sincere exchange of information about each participant's faith journey and sustaining religious tradition.

8. Dialogue seeks to share, challenge, and be challenged. Insisting ones own religious tradition's superiority inevitably undermines productive dialogue. We can be truly respectful of the integrity of our dialogue partner's religious identity only if we avoid all attempts at proselytizing.

9. Dialogue can occur on many levels besides that of theological discussion. For example, it is enriched through interactions of friendship and hospitality, working together in community projects and celebrations, and making common cause to solve social problems. Dialogue is most vital and effective when we cultivate together, open our homes to each other, and actually share our lives together.

10. Dialogue should be transformative, opening the windows of the mind and spirit to a broader vision of spiritual awareness in the world.

Dialogue in practice

Here are some practical suggestions for interfaith dialogue.

1. Anticipating that we will encounter both similarities and differences, dialogue recognizes that mutual acceptance and understanding, not absolute agreement, is the main goal. Initially, dialogue should focus on common features and similarities, without minimizing differences, while working to build the trust that will allow candid discussion of those differences.

2. We should have realistic expectations about our discussions. Dialogue is a long-term and ongoing process of building community, not a few shared encounters. Still, the journey can be taken only one step at a time. All participants should be encouraged to make an active and steadfast commitment to walking together toward understanding and peace.

Stig

 


#19 Mal

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 04:06 PM

Contribute real value to the discussion here. Be respectful (no insults, no porn). Keep it safe and legal.
My two cents, thanks.
Sean

Perhaps (another) reminder about the insult policy is needed (again)
KAP

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#20 Gerard

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 04:30 PM

How about mental flaming. How do we control it? ;)

Edited by durkhrod chogori, 27 January 2010 - 04:31 PM.


#21 tyler zambori

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 05:10 AM

I would like some clarification on exactly what
this "no insult policy" actually means in practice.

I would like to know, because if the moderators
won't adhere to it, it would be more honest
to announce that this is really a no-holds barred
sort of forum.

#22 thelerner

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Posted 02 June 2010 - 08:14 PM

I would like some clarification on exactly what
this "no insult policy" actually means in practice.

I would like to know, because if the moderators
won't adhere to it, it would be more honest
to announce that this is really a no-holds barred
sort of forum.


Hi Tyler,

Here is what Sean has written.


"Here is a repost of our insult policy, please read it and abide by it:

No personal insults.

It is totally fine to vocally disagree with a person's opinion, technique, politics, approach, lifestyle choice, etc.

But no insulting (or links to attacks) of individuals, nationalities, genders, political preferences, lifestyle choices, etc.

While this may sound restrictive and categorically un-Taoist, I believe it is a useful guideline to help us stop for a moment and think about how to present our perspectives intelligently without just flinging unproductive rudeness at each other. This way other members can receive value from your perspective and you can gain clarity by reasoning out why you initially felt compelled to verbally put down someone else for being different. No one, including the originating poster, gains anything from statements like "So and so is a complete moron", etc. If you have an opinion and you believe it's relevant to a topic at hand, post it as constructively as possible so we can learn from you, debate with you, ignore you, whatever.

If you can't abide by this simple constructive guideline, either create your post in "The Pit" or expect it to be moved there. This is our mini-octagon here for those of you that insist on a more primitive breed of taoist war."


I think:

Enforcement is at the discretion of the moderators. Its not a full time job, its mostly a hassle. Don't expect them to be watching the board every minute of the day, clamping down on who ever offends you. You can PM them (Mal, Sean, Stig, Taomeow..) about the post with a short explanation, then live by the decision when they come to. They can and do throw people off for a few days (too cool off) or permanently.

Most of the time this level of semi laissez-faire works well.

I've found if a person gets me so angry I want to freakin _)(&(^* and then $#@& up their (*&&^%ss, its a sign I'm losing perspective and need to voluntarily leave the board for a week or two (my productivity soars).

When I get back on the offending topic has moved to past pages, and I don't remember what got me so angry in the first place.

My 2 cents. Stay cool and keep the flames on the stove.


Michael
Push hard to get better, become smarter, grow your devotion to the truth, fuel your commitment to beauty, refine your emotional intelligence, hone your dreams, negotiate with your shadow, cure your ignorance, shed your pettiness, heighten your drive to look for the best in people, and soften your heart. A creed from Pronoia

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#23 tyler zambori

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 08:29 AM

Hi Tyler,

Here is what Sean has written.


"Here is a repost of our insult policy, please read it and abide by it:

No personal insults.

It is totally fine to vocally disagree with a person's opinion, technique, politics, approach, lifestyle choice, etc.

But no insulting (or links to attacks) of individuals, nationalities, genders, political preferences, lifestyle choices, etc.

While this may sound restrictive and categorically un-Taoist, I believe it is a useful guideline to help us stop for a moment and think about how to present our perspectives intelligently without just flinging unproductive rudeness at each other. This way other members can receive value from your perspective and you can gain clarity by reasoning out why you initially felt compelled to verbally put down someone else for being different. No one, including the originating poster, gains anything from statements like "So and so is a complete moron", etc. If you have an opinion and you believe it's relevant to a topic at hand, post it as constructively as possible so we can learn from you, debate with you, ignore you, whatever.

If you can't abide by this simple constructive guideline, either create your post in "The Pit" or expect it to be moved there. This is our mini-octagon here for those of you that insist on a more primitive breed of taoist war."


I think:

Enforcement is at the discretion of the moderators. Its not a full time job, its mostly a hassle. Don't expect them to be watching the board every minute of the day, clamping down on who ever offends you. You can PM them (Mal, Sean, Stig, Taomeow..) about the post with a short explanation, then live by the decision when they come to. They can and do throw people off for a few days (too cool off) or permanently.

Most of the time this level of semi laissez-faire works well.

I've found if a person gets me so angry I want to freakin _)(&(^* and then $#@& up their (*&&^%ss, its a sign I'm losing perspective and need to voluntarily leave the board for a week or two (my productivity soars).

When I get back on the offending topic has moved to past pages, and I don't remember what got me so angry in the first place.

My 2 cents. Stay cool and keep the flames on the stove.


Michael



Since they either won't or can't adhere to the no
insult policy, then it's just a pretty sign on
the top of the forum, and doesn't mean much.

You would probably be better off keeping
your increased productivity and staying
off of this cesspool. As would I, so...

SEE YA

#24 Stigweard

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 04:09 PM

Just for the record Tyler ... you made a report about the possible violation of another member. We reviewed the report and decided that it wasn't a clear cut breach of our insult policy.

Whilst we respected your views on the matter we decided to let it go and, if I recall correctly, by doing so a pretty interesting and insightful conversation transpired that would not have done so had we waded in with the "suspension stick".

You don't agree with our decision and it is your right to voice your objection, just as it is your right to exercise your free liberty of leaving our company.

Warm Regards

Stig :D

Stig

 


#25 WallaMike

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 01:03 PM

Posting this in here for greater accessibility.

This article (originally called "Guidelines for Christian-Muslim Dialog") was written for the Interfaith Cultural Organization of Athens for Christian-Muslim dialog, but I feel it is equally pertinent for The TaoBums seeing that, increasingly, we have Buddhists and Taoists engaging in focused and sincere dialog. I have adapted the article slightly for our purpose.

-------------------------------

Principles of Interfaith dialogue

1. Dialogue invites us to come together as people, not as belief systems. It acknowledges that each religious tradition is pluralistic within itself (i.e. Taoism has various monastic sects (Quanzhen, Longmen, Wudang, etc.) as well as philosophical and folk religious aspects just as Buddhism has Theravada, Mahayana, Zen, and Tibetan aspects), and realizes that each dialogue partner speaks from a particular religious perspective that cannot - and does not - represent all adherents of that faith. Dialogue also recognizes that each participant is located within a particular cultural, political, and economic perspective and inevitably brings particular loyalties, commitments, and preconceptions to the relationship. Through dialogue, we get to know one another as individuals.

2. Dialogue, which is characterized by courtesy and respect, is most productive when its participants are considerate, open-minded, and genuine in their desire to learn from the other partners. Each tradition's scripture, beliefs, and practices deserve our respect for having brought countless diverse people into a relationship with God/Buddahood/Tao/Divine Essence etc.

3. Dialogue is enhanced if participants have engaged in a preliminary investigation of the other faith tradition, as well as in an informed and self-critical reflection upon their own faith identity. We must come prepared to the best of our ability, for dialogue enjoins us to listen with and speak from the heart as much as the head, to be open, vulnerable, honest, and sensitive to feelings of frustration or offense.

4. Dialogue enables us to confront inherited preconceptions. It asks us to remember that Taoists and Buddhists share a history of both fruitful exchange and peace as well as of misunderstanding. In dialogue, we are mindful that ambiguous situations sometimes can be misinterpreted or misrepresented. Dialogue deliberately seeks to identify and dispel common stereotypes and inherited misconceptions based on misinformation.

5. Dialogue recognizes that in order to reach a clear understanding, we must pay attention to vocabulary. Some words have specialized meaning within a religious system; the meaning of others varies over time or within certain contexts or between cultures. Dialogue entails a careful clarification of our use of language.

6. Dialogue asks us first to understand, and only then to be understood. In dialogue, we listen in order to understand the other's point of view and seek to understand each person as they understand themselves. We seek to understand each religious system "from within" or on its own terms, while temporarily setting aside our own critical presuppositions.

7. Dialogue is enhanced by each participant's strong faith convictions. In a context of courteous listening and mutual trust, we can offer an authentic expression of our own personal faith. Dialogue involves a humble and sincere exchange of information about each participant's faith journey and sustaining religious tradition.

8. Dialogue seeks to share, challenge, and be challenged. Insisting ones own religious tradition's superiority inevitably undermines productive dialogue. We can be truly respectful of the integrity of our dialogue partner's religious identity only if we avoid all attempts at proselytizing.

9. Dialogue can occur on many levels besides that of theological discussion. For example, it is enriched through interactions of friendship and hospitality, working together in community projects and celebrations, and making common cause to solve social problems. Dialogue is most vital and effective when we cultivate together, open our homes to each other, and actually share our lives together.

10. Dialogue should be transformative, opening the windows of the mind and spirit to a broader vision of spiritual awareness in the world.

Dialogue in practice

Here are some practical suggestions for interfaith dialogue.

1. Anticipating that we will encounter both similarities and differences, dialogue recognizes that mutual acceptance and understanding, not absolute agreement, is the main goal. Initially, dialogue should focus on common features and similarities, without minimizing differences, while working to build the trust that will allow candid discussion of those differences.

2. We should have realistic expectations about our discussions. Dialogue is a long-term and ongoing process of building community, not a few shared encounters. Still, the journey can be taken only one step at a time. All participants should be encouraged to make an active and steadfast commitment to walking together toward understanding and peace.



Hello Stig:
You da man. Thanks for this enlightening material and I mean that literally. By following these interfaith dialogue suggestions, a person could not help but progress in their psychological and spiritual development.
WallaMike
PS: I'm making good progress in my standing meditation. Thanks for the suggestions!

#26 Stigweard

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Posted 16 July 2010 - 01:26 PM

Hello Stig:
You da man. Thanks for this enlightening material and I mean that literally. By following these interfaith dialogue suggestions, a person could not help but progress in their psychological and spiritual development.
WallaMike
PS: I'm making good progress in my standing meditation. Thanks for the suggestions!

Bkqi -- You are most welcome :) Glad to hear your practice is doing well.

Stig

 


#27 rth ߪ

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Posted 17 July 2010 - 04:04 PM

I suppose I should post this as a pm instead, but too late now.

I notice the potential for aggressive statements that may imply aggression that I have encountered on other forums. Statements like:

"WHAT DO YOU THINK THE PROBLEM IS?" or

Anything of a violent nature talking about bodily harm without the expressed threat of harm.

I am sure a few have encountered this before, along with malicious gossip, or seeking personal information to defame. Ultimately, it is your decisions as moderators how you wish to interpret my post. It just seems a necessity to inform of these possibilities.

Of course I wish to see the good in everyone, it is not my wish to hear of trifles, though I am sympathetic.

Pink Light
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#28 Encephalon

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Posted 05 October 2010 - 08:47 PM

I thought I'd post this list of Valuable Intellectual Traits as hammered out by the folks at the Foundation for Critical Thinking in Sonoma County, California. It seems pertinent to the written nature of our communication here in TTB.


VALUABLE INTELLECTUAL TRAITS

Intellectual Humility: Having a consciousness of the limits of one's knowledge, including a sensitivity to circumstances in which one's native egocentrism is likely to function self-deceptively; sensitivity to bias, prejudice and limitations of one's viewpoint. Intellectual humility depends on recognizing that one should not claim more than one actually knows. It does not imply spinelessness or submissiveness. It implies the lack of intellectual pretentiousness, boastfulness, or conceit, combined with insight into the logical foundations, or lack of such foundations, of one's beliefs.

Intellectual Courage: Having a consciousness of the need to face and fairly address ideas, beliefs or viewpoints toward which we have strong negative emotions and to which we have not given a serious hearing. This courage is connected with the recognition that ideas considered dangerous or absurd are sometimes rationally justified (in whole or in part) and that conclusions and beliefs inculcated in us are sometimes false or misleading. To determine for ourselves which is which, we must not passively and uncritically "accept" what we have "learned." Intellectual courage comes into play here, because inevitably we will come to see some truth in some ideas considered dangerous and absurd, and distortion or falsity in some ideas strongly held in our social group. We need courage to be true to our own thinking in such circumstances. The penalties for non-conformity can be severe.

Intellectual Empathy: Having a consciousness of the need to imaginatively put oneself in the place of others in order to genuinely understand them, which requires the consciousness of our egocentric tendency to identify truth with our immediate perceptions of long-standing thought or belief. This trait correlates with the ability to reconstruct accurately the viewpoints and reasoning of others and to reason from premises, assumptions, and ideas other than our own. This trait also correlates with the willingness to remember occasions when we were wrong in the past despite an intense conviction that we were right, and with the ability to imagine our being similarly deceived in a case-at-hand.

Intellectual Integrity: Recognition of the need to be true to one's own thinking; to be consistent in the intellectual standards one applies; to hold one's self to the same rigorous standards of evidence and proof to which one holds one's antagonists; to practice what one advocates for others; and to honestly admit discrepancies and inconsistencies in one's own thought and action.

Intellectual Perseverance: Having a consciousness of the need to use intellectual insights and truths in spite of difficulties, obstacles, and frustrations; firm adherence to rational principles despite the irrational opposition of others; a sense of the need to struggle with confusion and unsettled questions over an extended period of time to achieve deeper understanding or insight.

Faith In Reason: Confidence that, in the long run, one's own higher interests and those of humankind at large will be best served by giving the freest play to reason, by encouraging people to come to their own conclusions by developing their own rational faculties; faith that, with proper encouragement and cultivation, people can learn to think for themselves, to form rational viewpoints, draw reasonable conclusions, think coherently and logically, persuade each other by reason and become reasonable persons, despite the deep-seated obstacles in the native character of the human mind and in society as we know it.

Fairmindedness: Having a consciousness of the need to treat all viewpoints alike, without reference to one's own feelings or vested interests, or the feelings or vested interests of one's friends, community or nation; implies adherence to intellectual standards without reference to one's own advantage or the advantage of one's group.

Valuable Intellectual Virtues (June 1996). Foundation for Critical Thinking, online at website: www.criticalthinking.org

#29 rainbowvein

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 06:33 AM

Yes, it is wise to endeavor to compose good posts, but maybe some are more writing from a spiritual (or spiritually seeking) place, without a rigorously trained academic background.

scotty, let me add: what about recognizing the importance of EQ?

emotional intelligence - two aspects

This is the essential premise of EQ: to be successful requires the effective awareness, control and management of one's own emotions, and those of other people. EQ embraces two aspects of intelligence:

*Understanding yourself, your goals, intentions, responses, behaviour and all.
*Understanding others, and their feelings.
...

Emotional Intelligence links strongly with concepts of love and spirituality...

http://www.businessballs.com/eq.htm

In the end, isn't this primarily a spiritual forum? :)

#30 ralis

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Posted 06 October 2010 - 07:47 AM

Yes, it is wise to endeavor to compose good posts, but maybe some are more writing from a spiritual (or spiritually seeking) place, without a rigorously trained academic background.

scotty, let me add: what about recognizing the importance of EQ?


In the end, isn't this primarily a spiritual forum? :)


The guidelines in Blasto's post are not to be construed that critical thinking skills belong exclusively to trained academics. I would argue that if one puts forth the effort, then these skills can be acquired.

It is obvious to me that I need to work on my communication skills and am doing something about it. Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze are two writers that are interesting to me at the moment. Both of these writers are in some ways controversial. However, after just one hour of careful reading, I was able to clarify my thinking around an argument that was more emotionally based as opposed to a more well thought out rational point of view.


ralis

#31 Aaron

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 08:54 PM

Might I ask what the purpose is for deleting your own posts? I normally only do it if I think I've been a jackass and said something offensive or something that might be construed as offensive, I was wondering what your reasons were?

Aaron

Edited by Twinner, 29 November 2010 - 09:00 PM.

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#32 Mal

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 09:54 PM

I think your summation of possible reasons, while not exhaustive, is rather good ;)

Sometimes discussions get a bit heated and people might say things in the spur of the moment that they later think could have been said..... differently :D Hence the ability to edit you own posts, and the reason why sometimes you see a string of blank posts in a thread.

Since this is a sticky I really should delete the blank ones and tidy it up a bit, but.... well.... perhaps one day when I'm really bored :lol:
KAP

bye for now
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