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Without A Revolution, Americans Are History


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#1 Encephalon

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 12:15 PM

I've ripped people in here more than once for posting subject matter that seems entirely superfluous to the study of Taoism. Flowery quotes and melifluous language by one Swami after another just doesn't do it for me, so if people take me to task for posting irrelevent material, I guess I have it coming. My only defense is that I ultimately see Taoist principles being applied to whatever sustainable form of nationhood America ultimately evolves into. Whether it's health care, land use theory, or food production, Taoist principles, consciously or unconsciously, will prevail if we manage to get our act together. This article argues that we simply have to end foreign wars or risk going down harder than the Roman Empire. So, my tenous connection between Taoism and this article could take the "War and Nation Building" theme.

August 16, 2010

“Without A Revolution, Americans Are History.”
By Paul Craig Roberts

The United States is running out of time to get its budget and trade deficits under control. Despite the urgency of the situation, 2010 has been wasted in hype about a non-existent recovery. As recently as August 2 Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner penned a New York Times Column, Welcome to the Recovery.

As John Williams (shadowstats.com) has made clear on many occasions, an appearance of recovery was created by over-counting employment and undercounting inflation. Warnings by Williams, Gerald Celente, and myself have gone unheeded, but our warnings recently had echoes from Boston University professor Laurence Kotlikoff and from David Stockman, who excoriated the Republican Party for becoming big-spending Democrats.

It is encouraging to see a bit of realization that, this time, Washington cannot spend the economy out of recession. The deficits are already too large for the dollar to survive as reserve currency, and deficit spending cannot put Americans back to work in jobs that have been moved offshore.

However, the solutions offered by those who are beginning to recognize that there is a problem are discouraging. Kotlikoff thinks the solution is massive Social Security and Medicare cuts or massive tax increases or hyperinflation to destroy the massive debts.

Perhaps economists lack imagination, or perhaps they don’t want to be cut off from Wall Street and corporate subsidies, but Social Security and Medicare are insufficient at their present levels, especially considering the erosion of private pensions by the dot com, derivative and real estate bubbles. Cuts in Social Security and Medicare, for which people have paid 15% of their earnings all their life, would result in starvation and deaths from curable diseases.

Tax increases make even less sense. It is widely acknowledged that the majority of households cannot survive on one job. Both husband and wife work and often one of the partners has two jobs in order to make ends meet. Raising taxes makes it harder to make ends meet—thus more foreclosures, more food stamps, more homelessness. What kind of economist or humane person thinks this is a solution?

Ah, but we will tax the rich. The usual idiocy. The rich have enough money. They will simply stop earning.

Let’s get real. Here is what the government is likely to do. Once the Washington idiots realize that the dollar is at risk and that they can no longer finance their wars by borrowing abroad, the government will either levy a tax on private pensions on the grounds that the pensions have accumulated tax-deferred, or the government will require pension fund managers to purchase Treasury debt with our pensions. This will buy the government a bit more time while pension accounts are loaded up with worthless paper.

The last Bush budget deficit (2008) was in the $400-500 billion range, about the size of the Chinese, Japanese, and OPEC trade surpluses with the US. Traditionally, these trade surpluses have been recycled to the US and finance the federal budget deficit. In 2009 and 2010 the federal deficit jumped to $1,400 billion, a back-to-back trillion dollar increase. There are not sufficient trade surpluses to finance a deficit this large. From where comes the money?

The answer is from individuals fleeing the stock market into "safe" Treasury bonds and from the bankster bailout, not so much the TARP money as the Federal Reserve’s exchange of bank reserves for questionable financial paper such as subprime derivatives. The banks used their excess reserves to purchase Treasury debt.

These financing maneuvers are one-time tricks. Once people have fled stocks, that movement into Treasuries is over. The opposition to the bankster bailout likely precludes another. So where does the money come from the next time?

The Treasury was able to unload a lot of debt thanks to "the Greek crisis," which the New York banksters and hedge funds multiplied into "the euro crisis." The financial press served as a financing arm for the US Treasury by creating panic about European debt and the euro. Central banks and individuals who had taken refuge from the dollar in euros were panicked out of their euros, and they rushed into dollars by purchasing US Treasury debt.

This movement from euros to dollars weakened the alternative reserve currency to the dollar, halted the dollar’s decline, and financed the massive US budget deficit a while longer.

Possibly the game can be replayed with Spanish debt, Irish debt, and whatever unlucky country swept in by the thoughtless expansion of the European Union.

But when no countries remain that can be destabilized by Wall Street investment banksters and hedge funds, what then finances the US budget deficit?

The only remaining financier is the Federal Reserve. When Treasury bonds brought to auction do not sell, the Federal Reserve must purchase them. The Federal Reserve purchases the bonds by creating new demand deposits, or checking accounts, for the Treasury. As the Treasury spends the proceeds of the new debt sales, the US money supply expands by the amount of the Federal Reserve’s purchase of Treasury debt.

Do goods and services expand by the same amount? Imports will increase as US jobs have been offshored and given to foreigners, thus worsening the trade deficit. When the Federal Reserve purchases the Treasury’s new debt issues, the money supply will increase by more than the supply of domestically produced goods and services. Prices are likely to rise.

How high will they rise? The longer money is created in order that government can pay its bills, the more likely hyperinflation will be the result.

The economy has not recovered. By the end of this year it will be obvious that the collapsing economy means a larger than $1.4 trillion budget deficit to finance. Will it be $2 trillion? Higher?

Whatever the size, the rest of the world will see that the dollar is being printed in such quantities that it cannot serve as reserve currency. At that point wholesale dumping of dollars will result as foreign central banks try to unload a worthless currency.

The collapse of the dollar will drive up the prices of imports and offshored goods on which Americans are dependent. Wal-Mart shoppers will think they have mistakenly gone into Neiman Marcus.

Domestic prices will also explode as a growing money supply chases the supply of goods and services still made in America by Americans.

The dollar as reserve currency cannot survive the conflagration. When the dollar goes the US cannot finance its trade deficit. Therefore, imports will fall sharply, thus adding to domestic inflation and, as the US is energy import-dependent, there will be transportation disruptions that will disrupt work and grocery store deliveries.

Panic will be the order of the day.

Will farms will be raided? Will those trapped in cities resort to riots and looting?

Is this the likely future that "our" government and "our patriotic" corporations have created for us?

To borrow from Lenin, "What can be done?"

Here is what can be done. The wars, which benefit no one but the military-security complex and Israel’s territorial expansion, can be immediately ended. This would reduce the US budget deficit by hundreds of billions of dollars per year. More hundreds of billions of dollars could be saved by cutting the rest of the military budget, which in its present size, exceeds the budgets of all the serious military powers on earth combined.

US military spending reflects the unaffordable and unattainable crazed neoconservative goal of US Empire and world hegemony. What fool in Washington thinks that China is going to finance US hegemony over China?

The only way that the US will again have an economy is by bringing back the offshored jobs. The loss of these jobs impoverished Americans while producing over-sized gains for Wall Street, shareholders, and corporate executives. These jobs can be brought home where they belong by taxing corporations according to where value is added to their product. If value is added to their goods and services in China, corporations would have a high tax rate. If value is added to their goods and services in the US, corporations would have a low tax rate.

This change in corporate taxation would offset the cheap foreign labor that has sucked jobs out of America, and it would rebuild the ladders of upward mobility that made America an opportunity society.

If the wars are not immediately stopped and the jobs brought back to America, the US is relegated to the trash bin of history.

Obviously, the corporations and Wall Street would use their financial power and campaign contributions to block any legislation that would reduce short-term earnings and bonuses by bringing jobs back to Americans. Americans have no greater enemies than Wall Street and the corporations and their prostitutes in Congress and the White House.

The neocons allied with Israel, who control both parties and much of the media, are strung out on the ecstasy of Empire.

The United States and the welfare of its 300 million people cannot be restored unless the neocons, Wall Street, the corporations, and their servile slaves in Congress and the White House can be defeated.

Without a revolution, Americans are history.

Paul Craig Roberts was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury during President Reagan’s first term. He was Associate Editor of the Wall Street Journal. He has held numerous academic appointments, including the William E. Simon Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Georgetown University, and Senior Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.

#2 TheSongsofDistantEarth

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 01:12 PM

F*ck. I think you're right. Unfortunately, Blasto, I don't think there is anywhere safe to run long-term. Post-economic Apocalyptic reality-fuck is on the way, and stacking up canned goods in the mountains is not going to cut it if it's really going to happen. Stash away some good heroin to o.d. on as you go 'comfortably numb' on your way out of the earth plane.

#3 TheWhiteRabbit

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 01:19 PM

Yeah, woah Blasto. I would say try to not think about it but I know enough that you wouldnt like that.
I dont know yeah what Song said or "chase the dragon" that something something grape bubblegum. only a different strength. Or instead maybe delotid. They dont even give gunshot wound victims delotid. You wont feel anything.

You know, maybe that is the sign you are supposed to invent something to overcome some disaster? Course then again remember im nuts, :lol:

Edited by TheWhiteRabbit, 17 August 2010 - 01:23 PM.

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#4 pythagoreanfulllotus

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 01:21 PM

I've ripped people in here more than once for posting subject matter that seems entirely superfluous to the study of Taoism. Flowery quotes and melifluous language by one Swami after another just doesn't do it for me, so if people take me to task for posting irrelevent material, I guess I have it coming. My only defense is that I ultimately see Taoist principles being applied to whatever sustainable form of nationhood America ultimately evolves into. Whether it's health care, land use theory, or food production, Taoist principles, consciously or unconsciously, will prevail if we manage to get our act together. This article argues that we simply have to end foreign wars or risk going down harder than the Roman Empire. So, my tenous connection between Taoism and this article could take the "War and Nation Building" theme.

August 16, 2010

“Without A Revolution, Americans Are History.”
By Paul Craig Roberts

The United States is running out of time to get its budget and trade deficits under control. Despite the urgency of the situation, 2010 has been wasted in hype about a non-existent recovery. As recently as August 2 Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner penned a New York Times Column, Welcome to the Recovery.

As John Williams (shadowstats.com) has made clear on many occasions, an appearance of recovery was created by over-counting employment and undercounting inflation. Warnings by Williams, Gerald Celente, and myself have gone unheeded, but our warnings recently had echoes from Boston University professor Laurence Kotlikoff and from David Stockman, who excoriated the Republican Party for becoming big-spending Democrats.

It is encouraging to see a bit of realization that, this time, Washington cannot spend the economy out of recession. The deficits are already too large for the dollar to survive as reserve currency, and deficit spending cannot put Americans back to work in jobs that have been moved offshore.

However, the solutions offered by those who are beginning to recognize that there is a problem are discouraging. Kotlikoff thinks the solution is massive Social Security and Medicare cuts or massive tax increases or hyperinflation to destroy the massive debts.

Perhaps economists lack imagination, or perhaps they don’t want to be cut off from Wall Street and corporate subsidies, but Social Security and Medicare are insufficient at their present levels, especially considering the erosion of private pensions by the dot com, derivative and real estate bubbles. Cuts in Social Security and Medicare, for which people have paid 15% of their earnings all their life, would result in starvation and deaths from curable diseases.

Tax increases make even less sense. It is widely acknowledged that the majority of households cannot survive on one job. Both husband and wife work and often one of the partners has two jobs in order to make ends meet. Raising taxes makes it harder to make ends meet—thus more foreclosures, more food stamps, more homelessness. What kind of economist or humane person thinks this is a solution?

Ah, but we will tax the rich. The usual idiocy. The rich have enough money. They will simply stop earning.

Let’s get real. Here is what the government is likely to do. Once the Washington idiots realize that the dollar is at risk and that they can no longer finance their wars by borrowing abroad, the government will either levy a tax on private pensions on the grounds that the pensions have accumulated tax-deferred, or the government will require pension fund managers to purchase Treasury debt with our pensions. This will buy the government a bit more time while pension accounts are loaded up with worthless paper.

The last Bush budget deficit (2008) was in the $400-500 billion range, about the size of the Chinese, Japanese, and OPEC trade surpluses with the US. Traditionally, these trade surpluses have been recycled to the US and finance the federal budget deficit. In 2009 and 2010 the federal deficit jumped to $1,400 billion, a back-to-back trillion dollar increase. There are not sufficient trade surpluses to finance a deficit this large. From where comes the money?

The answer is from individuals fleeing the stock market into "safe" Treasury bonds and from the bankster bailout, not so much the TARP money as the Federal Reserve’s exchange of bank reserves for questionable financial paper such as subprime derivatives. The banks used their excess reserves to purchase Treasury debt.

These financing maneuvers are one-time tricks. Once people have fled stocks, that movement into Treasuries is over. The opposition to the bankster bailout likely precludes another. So where does the money come from the next time?

The Treasury was able to unload a lot of debt thanks to "the Greek crisis," which the New York banksters and hedge funds multiplied into "the euro crisis." The financial press served as a financing arm for the US Treasury by creating panic about European debt and the euro. Central banks and individuals who had taken refuge from the dollar in euros were panicked out of their euros, and they rushed into dollars by purchasing US Treasury debt.

This movement from euros to dollars weakened the alternative reserve currency to the dollar, halted the dollar’s decline, and financed the massive US budget deficit a while longer.

Possibly the game can be replayed with Spanish debt, Irish debt, and whatever unlucky country swept in by the thoughtless expansion of the European Union.

But when no countries remain that can be destabilized by Wall Street investment banksters and hedge funds, what then finances the US budget deficit?

The only remaining financier is the Federal Reserve. When Treasury bonds brought to auction do not sell, the Federal Reserve must purchase them. The Federal Reserve purchases the bonds by creating new demand deposits, or checking accounts, for the Treasury. As the Treasury spends the proceeds of the new debt sales, the US money supply expands by the amount of the Federal Reserve’s purchase of Treasury debt.

Do goods and services expand by the same amount? Imports will increase as US jobs have been offshored and given to foreigners, thus worsening the trade deficit. When the Federal Reserve purchases the Treasury’s new debt issues, the money supply will increase by more than the supply of domestically produced goods and services. Prices are likely to rise.

How high will they rise? The longer money is created in order that government can pay its bills, the more likely hyperinflation will be the result.

The economy has not recovered. By the end of this year it will be obvious that the collapsing economy means a larger than $1.4 trillion budget deficit to finance. Will it be $2 trillion? Higher?

Whatever the size, the rest of the world will see that the dollar is being printed in such quantities that it cannot serve as reserve currency. At that point wholesale dumping of dollars will result as foreign central banks try to unload a worthless currency.

The collapse of the dollar will drive up the prices of imports and offshored goods on which Americans are dependent. Wal-Mart shoppers will think they have mistakenly gone into Neiman Marcus.

Domestic prices will also explode as a growing money supply chases the supply of goods and services still made in America by Americans.

The dollar as reserve currency cannot survive the conflagration. When the dollar goes the US cannot finance its trade deficit. Therefore, imports will fall sharply, thus adding to domestic inflation and, as the US is energy import-dependent, there will be transportation disruptions that will disrupt work and grocery store deliveries.

Panic will be the order of the day.

Will farms will be raided? Will those trapped in cities resort to riots and looting?

Is this the likely future that "our" government and "our patriotic" corporations have created for us?

To borrow from Lenin, "What can be done?"

Here is what can be done. The wars, which benefit no one but the military-security complex and Israel’s territorial expansion, can be immediately ended. This would reduce the US budget deficit by hundreds of billions of dollars per year. More hundreds of billions of dollars could be saved by cutting the rest of the military budget, which in its present size, exceeds the budgets of all the serious military powers on earth combined.

US military spending reflects the unaffordable and unattainable crazed neoconservative goal of US Empire and world hegemony. What fool in Washington thinks that China is going to finance US hegemony over China?

The only way that the US will again have an economy is by bringing back the offshored jobs. The loss of these jobs impoverished Americans while producing over-sized gains for Wall Street, shareholders, and corporate executives. These jobs can be brought home where they belong by taxing corporations according to where value is added to their product. If value is added to their goods and services in China, corporations would have a high tax rate. If value is added to their goods and services in the US, corporations would have a low tax rate.

This change in corporate taxation would offset the cheap foreign labor that has sucked jobs out of America, and it would rebuild the ladders of upward mobility that made America an opportunity society.

If the wars are not immediately stopped and the jobs brought back to America, the US is relegated to the trash bin of history.

Obviously, the corporations and Wall Street would use their financial power and campaign contributions to block any legislation that would reduce short-term earnings and bonuses by bringing jobs back to Americans. Americans have no greater enemies than Wall Street and the corporations and their prostitutes in Congress and the White House.

The neocons allied with Israel, who control both parties and much of the media, are strung out on the ecstasy of Empire.

The United States and the welfare of its 300 million people cannot be restored unless the neocons, Wall Street, the corporations, and their servile slaves in Congress and the White House can be defeated.

Without a revolution, Americans are history.

Paul Craig Roberts was Assistant Secretary of the Treasury during President Reagan’s first term. He was Associate Editor of the Wall Street Journal. He has held numerous academic appointments, including the William E. Simon Chair, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Georgetown University, and Senior Research Fellow, Hoover Institution, Stanford University.


Yeah that's a brilliant column -- Paul Craig Roberts just keeps hitting the truth one line after another.

The corporate tax on value added based on location is a fascinating idea -- essentially tax evasion by corporations is the norm while the working class at taxed at 30 percent -- often higher than the super rich.

Anyway the issue is technology is in control -- so that the technology makes the off-shore move by corporations so easy, using computers, automation, etc. Even in China automation is the biggest threat to their sweatshop workforce. I just saw an article on NASA and GM collaborating to unleash a new robot workforce to replace even more U.S. workers.

Technology is the big taboo in our culture -- and Paul Craig Roberts leaves it untouched. Workers are being replaced by machines -- productivity is sky-rocketing but jobs are being cut -- labor costs are the biggest threat to wall street.

And so corporations as legal entities are just shell games -- corporations are constantly merging or using accounting fraud as ponzi schemes -- meanwhile the managers of the corporations are looting the corporate assets. There's literally just a few dozen individuals who are the most globally networked in running the economy via interlocking board of directors. Consider Kissinger on the China oil company board of directors -- in other words the global elite are destroying Earth quite literally. If things get real bad the global elite literally go underground into the FEMA cities -- as Dick Cheney did right after 911.

So Paul Craig Roberts is correct but he's not radical enough. Roberts does a great job in exposing the hypocrisy of the problem but the U.S. is a military empire -- so, as Noam Chomsky points out -- we rely on the military providing "veto power" over Japan and Germany's oil supply. By the U.S. using war to control oil then we control the domination of the U.S. dollar through petrodollars -- since we also force other countries to buy oil via U.S. corporations.

Those type of arrangements are not limited to the corporate structure but instead are arranged in secret with the global elite -- for example Iran was the main depositor for Rockefeller's ChaseManhattan bank -- so when Iran had its revolution, even though Iran's assets were frozen, there was still the lose of those petrodollars. So that's why Iran is "personal" for the elite -- it's not just about Israel -- it's about controlling the last vast oil supplies as Iran as 10 percent of the world's supply.

So in terms of technology Germany is attempting to switch from oil to solar, wind and whatever else -- mainly to free itself from the U.S. military veto-power over oil. Of course currently the export market to the U.S. makes Germany, Japan, China, etc. dependent on buying U.S. treasury notes -- but, as Roberts points out, soon the U.S. won't be able to buy many imports anyway.

Even Walmart will seem like Neiman Marcus indeed -- already the big megastores are donating their unsold food items to food shelves. Why? To stop a revolution!

http://www.washingto...ocal&Itemid=113

The country’s dire financial situation has left 15.3 million Americans unemployed. Now, more than ever, Americans suffer from hunger and experience difficulty providing nutritious foods for their families.

Kevin Concannon, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Undersecretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services noted that more Americans are looking to food banks and hunger relief organizations.

“Seventeen million households had difficulty putting food on the table in 2008, [the highest yearly figure] since 1995. Never before have the 60,000 food pantries and emergency shelters that provide food safety for Americans been [as] needed or important as they are today,” he said.

Walmart stores – including Sam’s Club stores – plan to donate 1.1 billion pounds of food, valued at $1.75 billion, to food banks. The retailer will also donate $250 million in grant monies to hunger relief organizations that include Meals on Wheels, a national organization that provides meals for senior citizens, and Share our Strength, a national organization that seeks to eliminate hunger among children.


And, of course, Walmart is pretending to be nice -- when in fact this food donation is of questionable quality yet a HUGE tax deduction:

http://thewritingonthewal.net/?p=10895

Assuming Wal-Mart’s donated food is valued at $1.75 billion, and their enhanced deduction is equal to half the donated food’s retail value, or $875 million, at a 35% tax rate, Wal-Mart could net a tax deduction of $306 million off their taxable income. Congress may have wanted to encourage donations, but it is the U.S. taxpayer who really loses this income.


Edited by drewhempel, 17 August 2010 - 01:24 PM.

Yeah Buddhism is actually Islam: "In fact, the Buddha died after eating a meal of pork,"


#5 Marblehead

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 02:08 PM

Well, I am an apathetic optimist so I am going to just sit here and wait for things to get better.

Peace & Love!

I reserve the right to be wrong.
 
post-42212-0-11315200-1380315953.jpg          I reserve the right to change my mind.          post-42212-0-03947700-1380315992.jpg
 
Peace & Contentment!
 
 
 


#6 vortex

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 02:47 PM

Most of his article makes sense except for this part:

The only way that the US will again have an economy is by bringing back the offshored jobs. The loss of these jobs impoverished Americans while producing over-sized gains for Wall Street, shareholders, and corporate executives. These jobs can be brought home where they belong by taxing corporations according to where value is added to their product. If value is added to their goods and services in China, corporations would have a high tax rate. If value is added to their goods and services in the US, corporations would have a low tax rate.

The real way for the US to bring back offshored jobs is for Americans to work harder and smarter. Restimulate American ingenuity.

Some more creative ways to encourage this would be to stop suppressing free energy, streamline the product development legal process or even award some national prize money for such inventions. Imagine if we had spent some of the billions we've wasted on Zionist neocon wars holding national invention contests instead???

Punishing others for competitive success only enables further underperformance here. In the long run, it is doomed to fail (see Communism) due to the global free market. Eventually, any Americans who could afford it would get so tired of paying ridiculously high prices for inferior domestic products and services here that they would simply expatriate to other countries that offer higher values. This would cause a progressive brain/upper class drain eventually leaving a 3rd world slum behind..

Imagine you needed a new alternative health device. And one in China cost $300 USD there. But it would cost you $1000 USD to buy it here due to all the protectionist tariffs slapped on it. There is no domestic version or only a far pricier and inferior knock-off. How would you like dem apples?

The highest quality of life is attained by free access to the goods and services of the highest values (benefit/cost ratio). Depriving people of this choice will only reduce their quality of life.

Edited by vortex, 17 August 2010 - 02:55 PM.

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I used to sit in full-lotus even on the can but there's not a lot of space in my bathroom. - drewhempel

#7 pythagoreanfulllotus

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 02:54 PM

Most of his article makes sense except for this part:The real way for the US to bring back offshored jobs is for Americans to work harder and smarter.

Punishing others for competitive success only enables further underperformance here. In the long run, it is doomed to fail (see Communism) due to the global free market. Eventually, any Americans who could afford it would get so tired of paying ridiculously high prices for inferior domestic products and services here that they would simply expatriate to other countries that offer higher values.

Imagine you needed a new alternative health device. And one in China cost $300 USD there. But it would cost you $1000 USD to buy it here due to all the protectionist tariffs slapped on it. There is no domestic version or only a far pricier and inferior knock-off.

The highest quality of life is attained by free access to the goods and services of the highest values (benefit/cost ratio). Depriving people of this choice will only reduce their quality of life.


I recommend watching this economics lecture by Professor Richard Wolff --

http://www.linktv.or...sm-hits-the-fan

In the 1950s, the economy was booming and America was flourishing. Wages were rising, and shopping malls had to be built to keep up with our mad desire to consume. Production and wages led to abundance. And when we couldn't afford to buy it, we started to borrow to get it. Capitalism ruled the world; we were living the American dream.

Now, after all those years of blissful prosperity, we suddenly find ourselves waking up in an economic twilight zone. What happened? Is this a normal bust, or is it what happens when "Capitalism Hits the Fan?"

To answer these questions, we turn to renowned economist Richard Wolff. Clearly and understandably, he explains the origins and scope of the economic meltdown we're in. Is it almost over? Or are there further catastrophes ahead? Find out in Capitalism Hits the Fan: Richard Wolff on the Economic Meltdown.


Yeah Buddhism is actually Islam: "In fact, the Buddha died after eating a meal of pork,"


#8 ralis

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 03:46 PM

Most of his article makes sense except for this part:The real way for the US to bring back offshored jobs is for Americans to work harder and smarter. Restimulate American ingenuity.

Some more creative ways to encourage this would be to stop suppressing free energy, streamline the product development legal process or even award some national prize money for such inventions. Imagine if we had spent some of the billions we've wasted on Zionist neocon wars holding national invention contests instead???

Punishing others for competitive success only enables further underperformance here. In the long run, it is doomed to fail (see Communism) due to the global free market. Eventually, any Americans who could afford it would get so tired of paying ridiculously high prices for inferior domestic products and services here that they would simply expatriate to other countries that offer higher values. This would cause a progressive brain/upper class drain eventually leaving a 3rd world slum behind..

Imagine you needed a new alternative health device. And one in China cost $300 USD there. But it would cost you $1000 USD to buy it here due to all the protectionist tariffs slapped on it. There is no domestic version or only a far pricier and inferior knock-off. How would you like dem apples?

The highest quality of life is attained by free access to the goods and services of the highest values (benefit/cost ratio). Depriving people of this choice will only reduce their quality of life.



Exactly where are the jobs located for "Americans to work harder and smarter"? Tax breaks for corporations to manufacture overseas and virtually no tariffs to level the playing field in manufacturing are stripping the U.S. of real wealth! What about the increased use of H1-B visas to unfairly reduce the number of computer techs in exchange for cheap foreign labor. Bill Gates started that particular movement while at the same time hired temporary workers for years to escape paying benefits.

You always come up with some laissez faire ideology to justify corporate greed at the expense of people!

Supply side economics only increases corporate power!

ralis

Edited by ralis, 17 August 2010 - 03:47 PM.


#9 WallaMike

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 04:25 PM

This was a different blog than I expected, since I was unable to identify much of a discussion of Taoist principles in it. Of course, Taoism means different things to different people and so I suppose it could be argued otherwise.

However, in looking at America from my interpretation of certain basic aspects of Taoism, I would probably comment on balance and coming back to balance. America seems to be quite out of balance at this time, and I just don't mean its deficits. The culture seems to have changed to become more insular, rigid and intolerant. If being with the Tao means to "bend like the willow", not snap like the dry blade of grass, then we need to get back to the basics.

Second, my interpretation is that Taoism at the highest level means being one with the Tao and thus following the dictates of the Tao. This is a very high level of development, of which perhaps only a handful of Americans (or any nation) could actually qualify. Perhaps if a high number of our politicians were more Taoist in outlook, things would look up. However, presently our system is such that to become a politician, it seems to self-select for certain, may I say, negative traits?

Or third, I might say that from a non-dual Taoist point of view, it is all perfect as it is and so nothing has to be done.

However, not being among those handful of enlightened Taoists in the US, I just muddle along as best as I'm able. I don't think the answer is in hyperbole or bashing other groups, or "being number 1". I think that the best way we can help America, or the world for that matter, is for as many of us as possible to become as enlightened and highly developed as we are able. When we reach that critical number of about 15% of the population, then we will be able to finally tap the creativity to solve these problems that presently seem so unsolvable.

Was it Einstein who first said that you can't solve a problem at the level that the problem is created at? This is why these seemingly "logical" arguments of "decrease the deficit", "increase the stimulus","decrease our dependence on oil", etc, go no where, since they are rooted in the same mind set that is creating the problem. We've become afraid and competitive, two tendencies not compatible with optimum creative problem solving.

Thus, I think if we loosened up our death grip on our ethnocentric "isms" and more of us looked inside to the stillness and emptiness of Tao, then perhaps out of emptiness and infinite potential could come the solutions to these immensely complicated problems. Well, that's my take on it; go figure.

#10 pythagoreanfulllotus

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 04:27 PM

Punishing others for competitive success


http://www.nlcnet.org/reports?id=0602

U.S.-Owned High Tech Jabil Factory in China Runs Like Minimum Security Prison Producing for Whirlpool, GE, HP

* Cruel and Inhuman Treatment at Jabil
o Standing 12 Hours a Day
o Management's Philosophy is to Break the Workers
o Complaints of Constant Stress and Anxiety
o Even Lower Level Managers Crack under the Constant Pressure
o Managers and Security Guards Patrol the Shop Floor like Police

* Grueling 12-hour shifts, seven days a week are the norm
o Even lunch and supper "breaks" are no real breaks at all
o One bathroom break in an eight-hour shift

* No Right to Know

* Pitting Temps against Full Time Workers


http://www.nlcnet.org/reports?id=0034

Posted Image

China's Youth Meet Microsoft
KYE Factory in China Produces for Microsoft and other U.S. Companies
"We are like prisoners... We do not have a life, only work."

-Teenaged Microsoft Worker

Edited by drewhempel, 17 August 2010 - 04:30 PM.

Yeah Buddhism is actually Islam: "In fact, the Buddha died after eating a meal of pork,"


#11 Birch

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 05:00 PM

"we can help America, or the world for that matter,"

I'd call for "helping America at home" first. The world (for all that it matters) can certainly wait (IMO).

In fact,from a pseudo-Taoist POV, lest "America" (whoever she is now) attempts to change the world (it cannot be done per TTC!) I wonder if she weren't be best off just leaving it all alone. What's the "fish-frying" verse of TTC?

Anyway, I don't see many other countries attempting such feats - oh wait, yeh, Italy sort of tried it a while back (no offense to any Italians present) - oh wait, also "The Greeks" (no offense to Greeks present) - oh wait, also "The British" - some nasty messes there! (No offense to the British present)

In fact, as someone pointed out to me the other day "The world" is actually right in my face. It is my family and friends, my coworkers and my lovers. My enemies (and my ex-lovers, this is not hard to see ;-)) My children. My food. My ideas. Myself Oh...bugger.
"Chi is free!"- "Don't give your chi to your practice" Both unknown, if you know where these come from, let me know!

#12 Encephalon

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 08:50 PM

This was a different blog than I expected, since I was unable to identify much of a discussion of Taoist principles in it. Of course, Taoism means different things to different people and so I suppose it could be argued otherwise.

However, in looking at America from my interpretation of certain basic aspects of Taoism, I would probably comment on balance and coming back to balance. America seems to be quite out of balance at this time, and I just don't mean its deficits. The culture seems to have changed to become more insular, rigid and intolerant. If being with the Tao means to "bend like the willow", not snap like the dry blade of grass, then we need to get back to the basics.

Second, my interpretation is that Taoism at the highest level means being one with the Tao and thus following the dictates of the Tao. This is a very high level of development, of which perhaps only a handful of Americans (or any nation) could actually qualify. Perhaps if a high number of our politicians were more Taoist in outlook, things would look up. However, presently our system is such that to become a politician, it seems to self-select for certain, may I say, negative traits?

Or third, I might say that from a non-dual Taoist point of view, it is all perfect as it is and so nothing has to be done.

However, not being among those handful of enlightened Taoists in the US, I just muddle along as best as I'm able. I don't think the answer is in hyperbole or bashing other groups, or "being number 1". I think that the best way we can help America, or the world for that matter, is for as many of us as possible to become as enlightened and highly developed as we are able. When we reach that critical number of about 15% of the population, then we will be able to finally tap the creativity to solve these problems that presently seem so unsolvable.

Was it Einstein who first said that you can't solve a problem at the level that the problem is created at? This is why these seemingly "logical" arguments of "decrease the deficit", "increase the stimulus","decrease our dependence on oil", etc, go no where, since they are rooted in the same mind set that is creating the problem. We've become afraid and competitive, two tendencies not compatible with optimum creative problem solving.

Thus, I think if we loosened up our death grip on our ethnocentric "isms" and more of us looked inside to the stillness and emptiness of Tao, then perhaps out of emptiness and infinite potential could come the solutions to these immensely complicated problems. Well, that's my take on it; go figure.


Gassho. This is precisely the quality of feedback I so often crave from this board, since I cannot often participate in the LA Buddhist/Taoist community without endless automobile commuting.

The way I connect Taoism with this subject matter is by unraveling the political and cultural themes of American life, which I define as consumer culture (I don't give much credence to American political mythology.) Americans had the dubious honor of being guinea pigs in the world's first domestic consumer market. We've been bombarded with commercial advertising since the late 1800s, and the technology has only gotten more sophisticated, more pernicious. If the capitalists' wet dream is to turn the world's resources into pure liquid capital, a vast consumer culture is the fastest way to do that, and toward that end, the process has performed admirably. We consumers have treated our masters well.

Unfortunately, consumerism just about kills every authentic human impulse we have and obliterates creativity and imagination, including the spiritual impulse. Indeed, David Loy suggests that globalization (global consumerism) IS religious, in that it elevates the gratification of the instincts to a sacrament.

I know I run the risk of being a hopeless romantic but Jeffersonian democracy and the agrarian ideal could conceivably be resurrected if the citizenry could ever break free of the tractor beam of Fox News and Glenn Beck. I see the historical accounts of ancient Taoist villages providing an intriguing template for a post-industrial model that in many ways is (was) as American as apple pie.

#13 pythagoreanfulllotus

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:13 PM

Gassho. This is precisely the quality of feedback I so often crave from this board, since I cannot often participate in the LA Buddhist/Taoist community without endless automobile commuting.

The way I connect Taoism with this subject matter is by unraveling the political and cultural themes of American life, which I define as consumer culture (I don't give much credence to American political mythology.) Americans had the dubious honor of being guinea pigs in the world's first domestic consumer market. We've been bombarded with commercial advertising since the late 1800s, and the technology has only gotten more sophisticated, more pernicious. If the capitalists' wet dream is to turn the world's resources into pure liquid capital, a vast consumer culture is the fastest way to do that, and toward that end, the process has performed admirably. We consumers have treated our masters well.

Unfortunately, consumerism just about kills every authentic human impulse we have and obliterates creativity and imagination, including the spiritual impulse. Indeed, David Loy suggests that globalization (global consumerism) IS religious, in that it elevates the gratification of the instincts to a sacrament.

I know I run the risk of being a hopeless romantic but Jeffersonian democracy and the agrarian ideal could conceivably be resurrected if the citizenry could ever break free of the tractor beam of Fox News and Glenn Beck. I see the historical accounts of ancient Taoist villages providing an intriguing template for a post-industrial model that in many ways is (was) as American as apple pie.



Hey blasto -- Seattle just passed a new "urban farming" law so that people can have up to 5 chickens in their house!

http://www.seattlepi..._urbanag15.html

Yeah Buddhism is actually Islam: "In fact, the Buddha died after eating a meal of pork,"


#14 3bob

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:23 PM

Most of the human forces and or names that seem to be behind a lot of this stuff are nothing more than pawns, pawns to the dark spirit of malice and hunger for power;
that dark spirit has no real root and will fail, and although some great harms are done to the Earth and to many Beings they will not be broken for such harms shall be resisted and undone by those rooted in the truth of the Way. Also, there really is no checking out and kissing your butt goodbye but there is a great reckoning in which we will reap what we have sown! (Taoist or anyone else for that matter)

Om

Edited by 3bob, 17 August 2010 - 09:25 PM.


#15 Martial Development

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:29 PM

...As John Williams (shadowstats.com) has made clear on many occasions, an appearance of recovery was created by over-counting employment and undercounting inflation. Warnings by Williams, Gerald Celente, and myself have gone unheeded, but our warnings recently had echoes from Boston University professor Laurence Kotlikoff and from David Stockman, who excoriated the Republican Party for becoming big-spending Democrats...


Writers such as Paul Craig Roberts need to redefine success, IMO. When the people who are willing to listen are able to listen, then you have accomplished everything you can as a messenger. You will never achieve universal recognition and acceptance. This kind of message will never appear on the front page of the newspaper--that space is reserved for the self-serving story that "nobody could have seen this coming".

There is no point in debating with wolves on the virtue of eating sheep. Or with the sheep for that matter!

Someone recommended the documentary Collapse a few weeks ago, on this forum. I finally got it from Netflix today--it was quite cogent, if short on solutions.

#16 pythagoreanfulllotus

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Posted 17 August 2010 - 09:34 PM

Writers such as Paul Craig Roberts need to redefine success, IMO. When the people who are willing to listen are able to listen, then you have accomplished everything you can as a messenger. You will never achieve universal recognition and acceptance. This kind of message will never appear on the front page of the newspaper--that space is reserved for the self-serving story that "nobody could have seen this coming".

There is no point in debating with wolves on the virtue of eating sheep. Or with the sheep for that matter!

Someone recommended the documentary Collapse a few weeks ago, on this forum. I finally got it from Netflix today--it was quite cogent, if short on solutions.


So you getting some chickens Chris? Yeah that was me posting Collapse -- here's the NY Times op-ed Ruppert posted on his blog:

http://opinionator.b...-generation/?hp

Yeah Buddhism is actually Islam: "In fact, the Buddha died after eating a meal of pork,"





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