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Stillness Movement Neigong and Michael Lomax's 'Light Warrior's Guide' Book


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#1 mjjbecker

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 10:03 PM

I suspect that if Michael Lomax was Chinese, wore the silk pyjamas and spoke in riddles, he would have people kicking down his door to learn from him. (Yes, I know I've written this before on another thread, but I like it as an intro).

Probably a few years back now, I first encountered Michaelís book while doing a browse of the different qigong and martial arts books on Amazon.com. While being drawn to the book, I was put off by the title and the cover-as well as the price. All of that was somewhat different to the usual books, with their pithy titles, nice artwork and price at around half the cost of Michaelís book.

The old saying about not judging a book by its cover rings true though, at least in this case (and perhaps the old saying about finding things at their right time as well). What made me change my mind and make the purchase though was reading Michaelís comments and observations on ĎThe Taobumísí Internet forum. Several things stuck out.

Firstly, his calm demeanour in the face of an initially hostile reception (Michael had to address the negative comments on his book, posted by a participant of this forum) was impressive. This calm and pleasant attitude followed through to Michaelís general participation. While others, myself included, would get pretty irate at times, Michael maintained a pleasant, non-hostile attitude despite provocation. This is something largely unheard of in the world of internet forums, particularly those occupied by Ďspiritual seekersí and Ďmartial artistsí. I was genuinely impressed.

Secondly, his descriptions of his own experiences regarding qigong/neigong. I am no stranger to high-level neigong, having personally met the famed John Chang at the invitation of the author of ĎThe Magus of Javaí. I got to witness John Chang first hand in his home, as well as during his later visit to Greece. I also have a teacher with abilities like John Changís. Fair to say I have some experience of remarkable happenings involving qi and the spirit world. Michaelís own anecdotes of his personal experiences, as well as the abilities of his teacher, Wang Juemin, were quite fascinating. There are many bullshitters who make up fantastic claims, but Michael gave me the impression he was being completely honest and up front.

Thirdly, a friend of mine attended one of Michaelís weekend seminars and posted a very positive review on ĎThe Taobumísí website. Again, a very positive impression was given of the man. This is hugely important, as an ethical, decent teacher is fundamental in learning these practices. Being taught incorrectly, or simply being taught bad practices can be very damaging to both the body and the psyche-something I have learned from past experience. It is also inevitable that some of the character of a teacher will rub off onto the student. People subconsciously and deliberately pick up the character traits of those they interact with.

Thanks to the Internet I was able to do some more research into Michael and particularly his teacher, Wang Juemin. Several people had visited him during the 1990ís and given remarkable accounts of their experiences with him. That Wang Juemin was a renowned qigong healer was something I was able to confirm myself, as I live in China and was able to get a Chinese friend to look into this for me.

From his neigong practice, Wang Juemin was able to survive nearly twenty years of terrible privation in a Chinese prison during the Cultural Revolution. This was a great boon to mankind as he had studied with, and was able to pass on to Michael Lomax, the combined wisdom of several of the greatest qigong masters of the twentieth century. That Wang Juemin had this wisdom was rare enough, but his willingness to share it with a non-Chinese made him almost unique. While Michael does not bang on about it, he does in fact have one of the best lineages of any neigong/qigong teacher anywhere.

So, from everything I had managed to learn, I finally decided to purchase the book. I was not disappointed. Perhaps the most important thing I found was that Michaelís comments in the book and his comments on the Internet were entirely consistent, even though there was a time gap of 8-10 years between them. The one sure way to spot a liar is that they inevitably contradict themselves at some point. Michael did not.

I thought I had had some Ďinterestingí experiences, having been around the likes of John Chang and others. They however seem to pale in comparison to those Michael details in his book. For those who have read the remarkable account of Wang Lipingís apprenticeship as the inheritor of the Longmen Pai lineage, (ĎEntering the Dragonís Gate), let me tell you Michaelís account is in many ways just as remarkable and fascinating.

Spirit guides that assist and guide the seeker when needed. Encounters with dark entities while helping the spirits of a Native American tribe ascend from their earthly bonds. Moving between the past, present and future in order to help others and himself. Moving between different dimensions. Last, but not least, meeting and learning from a remarkable master of neigong.

While the stories were all very interesting, they were not the reason I bought the book. I was interested in finding out more about the Stillness Movement neigong practice. I had read one review on Amazon.com where one person stated the inner quiet and peace they had got just from practicing what they had learned from the book (Michael himself recommends attending a seminar for the full benefit). Having experienced a few times a sense of profound stillness and peace myself, I was very interested in any practice that could deliver this.

The original reviewer on ĎThe Taobumísí had expressed their disappointment at what they considered a basic practice being detailed. It is true that it is not a complex process, but I know from experience that seemingly simple methods can be very powerful in their results.

All good methods of neigong/qigong release blockages and enhance the circulation of blood and qi. By doing this, stored up injuries, both physical and psychological, are released. The speciality of this practice is the natural manner in which this happens. The body moves itself, without conscious prompting. This allows the body to work towards what will balance it, without following a prescribed routine of set movements that may or may not also do the job.

This natural releasing of blockages allows the circulation to regain a healthy state and the mind to move towards a peaceful and clear state.

From my own experience I know the flow of qi was obviously enhanced (and I know the difference between real qi as opposed to just sensations). On several occasions Iíve experienced very noticeable feelings of qi during the practice.

Very interesting was the significant improvement of a long-standing shoulder injury. Other qigong had helped, but the Stillness Movement practice, in a short space of time, almost eliminated the pain completely. I am sure with continued practice it will remove the pain totally. Having lived with this pain for over three years, I was very, very impressed.

As the body balances out, the mind also comes to a more peaceful state. I find that simply from doing the practice, new and old issues arise but smoothly dissipate. It can genuinely be described as moving, healing, meditation.

As the practice can be done sitting down, it is very relaxing and does not require special breathing or any athletic ability to do. This means that an hours practice is not difficult to complete. I am a great believer in other forms of neigong/qigong also, but they can be physically and mentally difficult to practice for a meaningful amount of time. Stillness Movement is not.

For example, static standing practices are very good indeed, but do require a lot of stamina to practice over a long period of time. Simple sitting meditation requires holding a posture that can also cause fatigue. The movements of Stillness Movement prevent these issues from occurring and there is no resulting fatigue in my experience-either during or after the practice.

My own opinion is that this form of practice may indeed be related to the original neigong practice, as per the movements and dances of the ancient shamans. While following the practice, Iíve found myself performing qigong exercises that I had seen outlined in books but never personally practiced before. Iíve also found myself doing arm and waist movements reminiscent of Asian dancers, such as those in India or Bali. My arms would also do wide, sweeping movements, like they were gathering in qi. If I stood up I would find myself rotating around in circles. All of this was the body moving itself, none of it deliberate or forced. These lead to very definite energetic feelings and movements.

As well as detailing his personal experiences, Michael gives his insights into medical qigong (in which he is highly qualified and experienced), shamanism, and all manner of information related to energy and spiritual matters. While fascinating to read, as many of these aspects are not within my own personal experience I wonít comment on them.

Michael gives guidance on practice with the book that I also wholly agree with. That we are here to grow as individuals while being part of the whole is something I believe from my own experiences. Also that it takes consistent practice over a long time period in order to develop. It is all too easy to jump from one method to another and as a result see little to no improvement. Real attainment comes from daily practice of a method over a period of years. There are no shortcuts in that respect, though a good teacher can help a student progress, be it from correction or indeed using their own qi to help the student.

In conclusion, for someone looking for a practice that will enhance their life, or even add to their existing practice, I can very happily recommend this book. The stories will provide inspiration; the advice will provide useful guidance and the practice of Stillness Movement will benefit both body and mind. As with Michael, I strongly recommend that you find a teacher when learning qigong, and I am more than happy to recommend him and his method.
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#2 sifusufi

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 10:30 PM

Thank you mjjbecker
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#3 Raymond Wolter

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 10:35 PM

Great Review! Thank you :)

Ya Mu,

If it is not too much of a botheration, can you briefly explain the difference between Stillness Movement Qigong and Gifts of Tao Qigong? Are they both Medical Qigong systems? Do they have different goals? Is there a specific way to learn them as in learn A first and then B?

I searched the archives of this forum and saw that you said one can learn the Vibratory Qigong from DVD. However, that is not true w.r.t to Stillness-Movement as you need to project Chi directly? So, the book is basically to gain a theoretical understanding of the practice? Or one could get some benefit practicing from the book?

Thanks in advance.

#4 Starjumper

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 11:22 PM

Okay Mr. Becker, you sold me on it. :) I never expected to, I've only bought a couple of books on chi kung and haven't gotten one in over a decade, I think.
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#5 mjjbecker

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 11:30 PM

Okay Mr. Becker, you sold me on it. :) I never expected to, I've only bought a couple of books on chi kung and haven't gotten one in over a decade, I think.


Thank you, I really appreciate you saying so. :)
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#6 mjjbecker

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Posted 29 July 2010 - 11:32 PM

'Raymond Wolter' and 'sifusufi' you are both very welcome. :)
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#7 Hundun

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 01:14 AM

i have to say,

i'm a bit surprised to see you (mjjbecker) come out in support of Ya Mu like this. i remember you doing a very similar thing when you supported vajrasattva's work, but i didn't expect lightning to strike twice in this case.

i don't know a lot about your history except for superficial details, but i had come to trust your opinion as that of a sincere practitioner and seeker. based on the strength of your review, i'm inclined to purchase the book and see for myself.

BUT,

since your review is so overwhelmingly positive, i think that makes this thread the appropriate space with which to express my misgivings about Ya Mu's teachings.

first, i also read the negative review it was given by a member of this forum, as well as the first response to that review from a guy named chris on amazon.com. if chris' response is in any way an accurate portrayal of Stillness-Movement Qigong, then it's just one of many other schools that employ spontaneous, natural flow qigong, and i probably don't stand to learn much from the book. i DO believe that spontaneous, natural flow is kind of the "hidden secret" of modern day practice that keeps a lot of hard-working students from breaking through to higher levels, but if that's the only true gem that the book has to offer, then i would recommend the textbook that i use which is much more thorough and costs less: Healing Promise of Qi. also, Grandmaster Wong Kiew-Kit, a master who has often been dismissed in this forum (and this continues to perplex me), teaches a method called Flowing Breeze, Swaying Willow, which is also a spontaneous, natural flow practice. it's the foundation of Shaolin Cosmos Qigong.

i employ an element of 'natural flow' in every form i practice, and i believe it to be the gem that allows me to accelerate my development (as well as the development of my students) beyond the conventional timeline of the traditional practice. kind of a no-brainer to me, and since Sloppy Zhang recently posted a thread about transmissions, i should also mention that people like Sloppy Zhang pick up clues like this, often under-emphasized in obscure places, and they excel beyond other folks who put in far more hours. Sloppy Zhang is the kind of practitioner that would probably read Ya Mu's book and NOT be impressed. because he already gets it, and he just doesn't get how other committed practitioners don't see it. my own development has followed a very similar trajectory.

That having been said, i have still always admired Ya Mu's knowledge in various topics on this board. i rarely find myself in disagreement with his perspective, and he sorta won my heart when he gave honor to Master Duan Zhi Liang in a thread in which he and i were both participating. Master Duan taught me about the importance of honoring the element of chaos in all things, and i believe that THAT'S the basis for Stillness-Movement Qigong as well. many students are indeed missing this and would do well to learn it. but this can be learned in many other styles, which kind of makes Stillness-Movement a bit unremarkable to me.




but what REALLY put me off of Ya Mu's teachings, and i'm really hoping to get a response/some clarification, is that he posted a video, which i consider to be fraudulent, in order to attract students.

http://www.thetaobum...-qi-projection/

it's not the student's movements that i find problematic, as i have clients who shake and twist and move as well. i know that this kind of thing happens. it's the comment he made later on the same page:

I project front and back, top and bottom, and (no direction that can be described - dimensionally). What you may have missed in the video at one point I was working on heart through the front. And yes, you are correct about the non-linearity; I could have stood several feet away turned in the opposite direction and done the same thing - wouldn't have looked good on camera :lol: :lol: :lol:


this killed it for me, and while most might take this as nit-picking, i felt like it makes all the difference in the world. i was very disappointed to see Mr. Lomax resort to theatrics in order to appear more "masterful," more like "the doer with all the power," to attract more people who are seduced by that kind of thing. had he sat cross-legged on the floor, just facing the general direction of the student so we knew who he's directly affecting, and without all the theatrical hand movements, i would have contacted him long ago to study with and perhaps exchange ideas.

i understand the impulse to give in to the unnecessary theatrics, as that seems to be what so many are looking for. But i don't respect it. and most importantly, i've never given into it in my own teaching.

this is something i've wanted to post since Ya Mu first posted that Stillness-Movement thread, but i'm glad i waited until now. i'm totally open to criticism on this, and if anyone thinks i'm missing something, PLEASE share it.

i have always liked Ya Mu and how he represents himself for the most part on TTB, but as a fellow teacher/genuine sincere student of the art, i couldn't just overlook something i consider to be a matter of integrity.
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#8 三江源

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 02:59 AM

I could have stood several feet away turned in the opposite direction and done the same thing - wouldn't have looked good on camera :lol: :lol: :lol:


I read this as Michael being an astute communicator. Too many people dont even believe in qi projection at all, their suspension of disbelief may just about be managed when they have a literal depiction of projection, but if they cant see where the qi is even coming from, cant see a direct literal line of projection.. then they will resort to the position of "It aint real"...

Visually, it could have looked utterly lacking a narrative, really quite devoid of meaning, without Michael physically being explicit.

It happens so often even on this board that people fail to believe what others experience, and attempt to impose a rationale on it that negates a reality which they arent sharing.

#9 Birch

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 05:23 AM

Throwing this in http://www.sciencedi...bf5a8e3fb5acf46

Thanks for the review. I'm going to check out that book. Still it does seem as if we're re-circling around the issue of "transmission" again.
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#10 rainbowvein

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 05:33 AM

Beautiful! :D mjjbecker, thanks for sharing.

Glad you got to experience Michael's

...moving, healing, meditation.

Blessings. :wub:

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:14 AM

Thanks mjjbecker, and hundun for completing the opposite part, very interesting posts.
No matter what system we talk about, I doubt it can be learned from books or seminars.
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#12 VCraigP

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 06:31 AM

Okay Mr. Becker, you sold me on it. :) I never expected to, I've only bought a couple of books on chi kung and haven't gotten one in over a decade, I think.


OK Then.
Can we expect your follow on review in due course?

Hope so.

Craig
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#13 mjjbecker

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 09:39 AM

i have to say,

i'm a bit surprised to see you (mjjbecker) come out in support of Ya Mu like this. i remember you doing a very similar thing when you supported vajrasattva's work, but i didn't expect lightning to strike twice in this case.

i don't know a lot about your history except for superficial details, but i had come to trust your opinion as that of a sincere practitioner and seeker. based on the strength of your review, i'm inclined to purchase the book and see for myself.

BUT,

since your review is so overwhelmingly positive, i think that makes this thread the appropriate space with which to express my misgivings about Ya Mu's teachings.

first, i also read the negative review it was given by a member of this forum, as well as the first response to that review from a guy named chris on amazon.com. if chris' response is in any way an accurate portrayal of Stillness-Movement Qigong, then it's just one of many other schools that employ spontaneous, natural flow qigong, and i probably don't stand to learn much from the book. i DO believe that spontaneous, natural flow is kind of the "hidden secret" of modern day practice that keeps a lot of hard-working students from breaking through to higher levels, but if that's the only true gem that the book has to offer, then i would recommend the textbook that i use which is much more thorough and costs less: Healing Promise of Qi. also, Grandmaster Wong Kiew-Kit, a master who has often been dismissed in this forum (and this continues to perplex me), teaches a method called Flowing Breeze, Swaying Willow, which is also a spontaneous, natural flow practice. it's the foundation of Shaolin Cosmos Qigong.

i employ an element of 'natural flow' in every form i practice, and i believe it to be the gem that allows me to accelerate my development (as well as the development of my students) beyond the conventional timeline of the traditional practice. kind of a no-brainer to me, and since Sloppy Zhang recently posted a thread about transmissions, i should also mention that people like Sloppy Zhang pick up clues like this, often under-emphasized in obscure places, and they excel beyond other folks who put in far more hours. Sloppy Zhang is the kind of practitioner that would probably read Ya Mu's book and NOT be impressed. because he already gets it, and he just doesn't get how other committed practitioners don't see it. my own development has followed a very similar trajectory.

That having been said, i have still always admired Ya Mu's knowledge in various topics on this board. i rarely find myself in disagreement with his perspective, and he sorta won my heart when he gave honor to Master Duan Zhi Liang in a thread in which he and i were both participating. Master Duan taught me about the importance of honoring the element of chaos in all things, and i believe that THAT'S the basis for Stillness-Movement Qigong as well. many students are indeed missing this and would do well to learn it. but this can be learned in many other styles, which kind of makes Stillness-Movement a bit unremarkable to me.




but what REALLY put me off of Ya Mu's teachings, and i'm really hoping to get a response/some clarification, is that he posted a video, which i consider to be fraudulent, in order to attract students.

http://www.thetaobum...-qi-projection/

it's not the student's movements that i find problematic, as i have clients who shake and twist and move as well. i know that this kind of thing happens. it's the comment he made later on the same page:



this killed it for me, and while most might take this as nit-picking, i felt like it makes all the difference in the world. i was very disappointed to see Mr. Lomax resort to theatrics in order to appear more "masterful," more like "the doer with all the power," to attract more people who are seduced by that kind of thing. had he sat cross-legged on the floor, just facing the general direction of the student so we knew who he's directly affecting, and without all the theatrical hand movements, i would have contacted him long ago to study with and perhaps exchange ideas.

i understand the impulse to give in to the unnecessary theatrics, as that seems to be what so many are looking for. But i don't respect it. and most importantly, i've never given into it in my own teaching.

this is something i've wanted to post since Ya Mu first posted that Stillness-Movement thread, but i'm glad i waited until now. i'm totally open to criticism on this, and if anyone thinks i'm missing something, PLEASE share it.

i have always liked Ya Mu and how he represents himself for the most part on TTB, but as a fellow teacher/genuine sincere student of the art, i couldn't just overlook something i consider to be a matter of integrity.


I speak as I see. If that does, or does not cause surprise, so be it. The intention is simply to add my tuppence worth to the mix. People can and will respond in light of their own experiences and opinions. C'est la vie.

No one should blindly accept-or dispute-anything I write here. If they feel compelled enough, then they can take it for checking. That is how we learn. That is how I've learned and picked up information. Without the prior comments by Michael Lomax and others, I would not have bought the book and tried the practice.

There's lots of good information out there from different sources. The purpose of reviews like mine is to highlight a particular one. There is the opportunity for others to do likewise by starting their own threads.

I mean this in a non-confrontational way and without any intent to be unpleasant. However, this thread isn't about you. Like your comments elsewhere, I get the impression that you are jumping in more to say how much you know. I understand the point of establishing ones credibility, but that can be done in a far more concise manner.

You're right in saying you know little about me beyond superficial details. That is because the strength of my arguement is far more important and relevant in a discussion that me banging on about how wonderful I am and how much I know. I can't cure cancer but I have been known to kick hubris squarely in the balls with attention getting results.

Sometimes when one sees nice things being said about others, even if we disagree, resisting the temptation to jump in and piss all over it is a good thing. I don't think you needed to make the comments about Santiago on the 'Shaktipat' thread. If he didn't dispute the comparison to Wang Liping it is likely because he gave it little to no thought. He has always shown humilty and respect to his teachers, so he isn't prone to raising himself on a pedestal. He expresses what he thinks in a forthright manner is all.

I've always had the impression that Michael Lomax is sincere in what he says and does. If I had doubts, I would go and find out for myself, or let it pass, rather than just jump in crying 'fraud'. I don't know you from Adam, so I would not presume to rain on your parade in such a manner. Claiming to be outspoken is not a justification for being crass. If you wanted to bring up the matter of the video, you could-and should-have done it on that particular thread.

If I wanted to recommend particular books, I would show some tact. 'Buy this one, it's half the price and twice the value' kind of remarks on a thread reviewing a particular book is hardly polite. I don't think you would care to have someone behave this way towards you.

Whatever the merits of those other methods are, they are not what is being discussed on this thread. It is not a 'Spontaneous Qigong' thread. I'd consider myself ignorant if I'd posted my thoughts on Stillness Movement in one of Jenny Lamb's seminar announcements, or in one of the Kunlun threads. They are specific to a particular method, not to a particular genre.

If you do choose to investigate further what Michael has to offer, I hope you can do so objectively. It might also help to keep in mind the old zen advice about emptying ones cup beforehand.

My best,

Mike
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#14 Starjumper

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 09:58 AM

OK Then.
Can we expect your follow on review in due course?

Hope so.

Craig

Well I'm not so sure :) I felt kind of like an idiot for ordering the book and now that I read Hundun's post I feel more like an idiot. Reading about how the chi kung can be done sitting in a chair and that it appears to be more and more like spontaneous flopping around kind of turns me off. I might cancel the order.

I'm such a sucker sometimes, too impulsive, getting swayed by a good spiel. At first I even fell for Max's opening statement, but quickly changed my mind after seeing all the other untruths.

I watched the video that Hundun posted and I must say it doesn't sit quite right with me. The reason is because the patient's movements don't correspond to the healing hand movements. I've seen plenty of hand/energy work by people with a lot of energy and the subjects movements frequently correspond to the actions of the projector. For example if you want to make someone do a flopping around chi dance then you give them a little energy for just a few seconds and they can dance for minutes with no additional input. However, when doing healing work they don't usually do that dance because the energy should be directed to and generally confined to whatever area is being worked on. Of course there is some overflow energy also.

In general if I do energy work on someone: if I compress energy into their bodies then they will wiggle around and shudder, but they are sitting, so no dance. If they are standing and I push energy at them they will be pushed away, if I pull they will be pulled towards me, almost falling down if I do it to them when they aren't expecting it and have their eyes closed. However, when working on a specific part they usually just feel buzzing, pressure, heat, flowing, or extraction and it doesn't cause much moving. My kung fu teacher (not my chi kung teacher) can make people move in specific ways that he wants, as if they were a puppet on a string, with a great deal of control, whether they cooperate or not. My chi kung teacher can move his hand suddenly one inch while he is standing ten feet away and you feel like you were hit by an explosion, but it doesn't make you move.

Anyway, long story short, I think Hundun had the right idea, that it is partly theatrics.

What I can say from my experience, after having watched the video, is that the subject was very yin and sensitive to energy, and he probably had a history of doing energy work with Ya Mu. People who are very yin and sensitive to energy will have strong responses but the opposite type who has hard muscles and is very grounded and yang might not feel a thing and won't move. Just as an experiment I'm going to try to move someone with energy while their backs are turned to me. I want to find some musclebound worker type who is absolutely numb to energy and try it on them. I'll bet that even though they can't feel the energy that they can be moved.

I guess I'm going off on a tangent here, I should be working :ninja:

Oh ya, I know, once I was visiting my next door neighbors down the canyon up at my place in the mountains. The neighbor's wife and I had just finished a bowl of primo weed and I decided to try to see if and how she could feel energy work and she was interested. So while she was sitting there I tried some different stuff like I do when my students are sitting and each time I did a different technique she exclaimed stuff like:
WOW!
Oh my gawww...
Oooooh
Wow
That's amazing!
Oh my
and so on and so forth.

It actually spooked me a little bit because that was the first time I tried doing it 'just for fun'. Then I tried it on the husband, who is a hard working building contractor, and he didn't feel nuthin'.

Once I did a demo at a Reiki practitioner's meetup and when I did the thing that I call sprinkling stardust (or pixie dust) which feels like a gentle sparkly shower to the subject, she exclaimed: "What on Earth are you doing?" and had to look up at my hands :lol:

So yeah, whatever, do you think I should still get the book?

Edited by Mal, 30 July 2010 - 07:05 PM.
Insult removed

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#15 OldChi

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 10:33 AM

I'm usually pretty good at smelling bull-shit and from what i've read Michael Lomax seems like a genuine cat. I've not tried the still-ness movement qigong but am learning the Gift of the Tao from his DVD and am enjoying it.

-I also believe it says in his book that Michael works at an alternative medicine hospital and has been healing for years. It would appear that he not only talks the talk but walks the walk.

-I also recently read the book and very much enjoyed.

#16 mjjbecker

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Posted 30 July 2010 - 10:41 AM

Reading about how the chi kung can be done sitting in a chair and that it appears to be more and more like spontaneous flopping around kind of turns me off.


Thanks, Feng Zhiqiang is a grand teacher of mine and I've learned the Hunyuan system.


Then you will know that Hu Yao Zhen taught neigong to Grandmaster Feng? You obviously don't know that spontaneous movement is recognized within the Hunyuan system though. Don't believe me? Go and ask someone senior within the school. Perhaps you never got past the basic exercises?

Relevance?

Hu was also one of Wang Juemin's teachers. Not only that, but Hu 'invented' Stillness Movement neigong. He wrote a book on it in the 1940's. Hu's daughters still teach it*, and videos of them demonstrating can be seen on 'You Tube'. Yes, spontaneous movement with all the trimmings. Performed standing, and yes, sitting on a chair.

That's the thing about making sure you drink deeply from the well of knowledge. A little does indeed seem to intoxicate some.



*For anyone interested, the only places that I know of that they have taught is parts of Europe and currently in Beijing. Given this, learning from Michael Lomax is an easier teacher to access.
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